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Underwater Video 101

  
  
  
  
  

Underwater Video 101

By: Megan c/o PADI  

 

With underwater cameras getting cheaper and more accessible, many divers have taken a giant stride into the world of underwater video. Here are some useful tips.

Tip #1 Get the right accessories

  • Don’t use the generic GoPro accessories like the head or chest strap. Strap a camera to your head and you’re bound to get jerky footage with poor composition.

  • A red filter or a dive light made for photos/video is a must. Call your dive center and get one of these items before you put one toe in the water. If you get a red filter, don’t forget to take it off when shooting topside (see photo below).

  • A “tray” with a handle will also serve you well. The goal is to get as steady of a shot as possible. Being able to hold a large object with two hands (versus a teeny camera with one hand) will improve the steadiness of your shot and make your video look more professional. Not to mention, a tray with a handle makes for a more secure hand-off to the Divemaster. An extending pole is another useful item as it allows you to get closer to marine life such as eels slowly and from a respectful distance.

Tip #2 Tell a Story

  • Do you have any goals for the trip? Tell us upfront either as a video testimonial or using subtitles. That final scene with a whale shark, or 1,000th dive celebration will make your video more meaningful.

  • Collect shots of the boat, your hotel, interesting topside life or interesting buildings. Use these to create an intro montage to establish a sense of place.

Tip #3 Dive and Shoot Within Your Limits  

When you’re just starting out: choose stationary or slow-moving subjects. Film tires, coral heads, wrecks, a turtle scratching its butt, etc.

Good buoyancy skills are essential. If your buoyancy is poor, your video viewers will know – your footage will be uneven. You also won’t be able to film interesting creatures that require a slow and steady approach. If you feel the least bit in doubt about your skills, enroll in a buoyancy class (you won’t regret it).

 

Tip #4 Include Other Divers – Most Importantly Yourself!  

  • Other divers can both make and mess up your videos.  If diving in a herd, try to get in front. Divers swimming toward you are more interesting than those swimming away. Bonus: you’re more likely to get the cool critter shot before someone else scares it away.

  • If you encounter a large critter or sponge of remarkable size, try to film your dive buddy next to it. Lastly, keep in mind the main audience for your video will be friends and family; and to them, you are a star. They want to see footage of you. Have your buddy capture you swimming near some cool marine life, or if you’re diving from a dinghy, go for the back-roll selfie!

  Tip #5 Post-production

  • If you’re interested in some royalty-free music, Youtube has libraries of free music. If your video takes place in another country, ask your dive crew or taxi driver about popular local bands and spice up your video with local sounds.

  • Less is more! Trim each clip to about five seconds – unless your shot is really, really amazing (like a whale shark or a seahorse giving birth). Aim for a total video length of no more than three minutes. Two minutes is ideal.

  • If you’ve got a long clip where something interesting happens in the beginning and the end, the best thing to do is to break them up into two clips. If this isn’t possible, break up a lackluster middle section by throwing in some interesting facts or trivia about where you’re diving. This can be done in iMovie or in youtube.

 

Underwater Photography at Turtle Bay: Hero3 Cube Red Filter

  
  
  
  
  

Go Pro Filter

 

Do have problems with the colors in your underwater photographs and videos - everything green or blue - no bright colors?

Polar Pro Filter's red filter is designed for the GoPro Hero3 camera. The red  filter color corrects for the GoPro's auto white balance. When filming  underwater, red light is not present and the GoPro does not take the lack of  red light loss into account. This can often cause videos to be too green or  too blue. Just snap on a Polar Pro red filter which will reduce excess blues  and greens therefore reinstating vibrant reef colors back into your GoPro  dive videos!


Check out our site for comparison videos and see how our simple $29.99 filter  can turn your GoPro into a production quality scuba camera.

Here is the detailed product information:
- constructed with strong optically correct Acrylic;
- filter snaps on and off seamlessly; and
- includes filter, tether, and storage bag

For more information go to:

www.polarprofilters.com

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