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How To Be The Best Buddy

  
  
  
  
  

How To Be The Best Buddy

By Nadia Aly

 

The buddy system used in scuba diving is key in ensuring the mutual safety and enjoyment of both yourself as well as your diving partner, with the following being some exemplary buddy behaviours.
 
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Form a Plan and Stick to It
Pre-dive, formulate a plan with your buddy that both of you will stick to, with regards to the duration of the dive, the sites to visit, as well as any other major discussion points. 
 
Assist Your Buddy With Their Equipment
Some scuba gear may be difficult to get in and out of alone, and if heavy equipment is to be brought along during the dive, the load should always be divided between both parties.
 
Form a Plan and Stick to It
Pre-dive, formulate a plan with your buddy that both of you will stick to, with regards to the duration of the dive, the sites to visit, as well as any other major discussion points. 
 
Assist Your Buddy With Their Equipment
Some scuba gear may be difficult to get in and out of alone, and if heavy equipment is to be brought along during the dive, the load should always be divided between both parties.
 
Double Check Your Buddy's Equipment Pre-Dive
It never hurts to have another set of eyes to look over the set-up of your equipment, and to make sure that everything is working properly. Make sure to do this for your buddy pre-dive!
 
Maintain Active Communication During the Dive
Always keep a clear line of communication with your buddy throughout the dive using hand signals. Do so actively so that both parties are aware of the other's status at all times.
 
Stay Close to Your Buddy Throughout the Dive
While it may be tempting to wander off on your own to explore the dive site, resist the urge. Always stay close to your buddy as you would be surprised a how easy it is to loose sight of one another.
 

The Proper Scuba Dive Weighting

  
  
  
  
  

The Proper Scuba Dive Weighting

 

Guidelines for Proper Weighting.  We all know that most new divers tend to need a bit more weight than seasoned ones because Buoyancy Control takes several dives to master.  Common types of weights include pouchstyle with lead pellets (left) or solid lead style. 

Here is the best rule of thumb for weighting:
FRESH Water:
Swimsuit or DiveSkin- Begin with 1 to 4 pounds / 0.5/2kg
Thin 3mm wetsuits or Shorty- 5% of your Body Weight
Medium Thickness 5mm suits- 10% of your Body Weight
Cold Water 7mm with hood/gloves- 10% of your Body Weight plus 3-5 pounds / 1.5/3kg
Neoprene Drysuit- 10% of your Body Weight plus 7-10 pounds / 3-5kg
Shell Style Dry Suits w/o under garment – 10% of your Body Weight plus 3-5 pounds / 1.5/3kg
Shell Style Dry Suits w/ heavy under garment – 10% of your Body Weight plus 7-14 pounds / 3-7kg
The undergarments vary quite a bit as they can realy add allot surface area to you thus increasing the amount of weight needed to stay neutrally buoyant.
Salt Water Diving (add to above calculations for Fresh Water)
100 to 125 lb (45-56kg) add 4 pounds (2kg)
126 to 155 lb (57-70kg)  add 5 pounds (2.3kg)
156 to 186 lb (71-85kg) add 6 pounds (3kg)
187 to 217 lb (86-99kg) add 7 pounds (3.2kg)
Always do a buoyancy check before beginning your dive and also factor in that if you are diving with an aluminum 80 tank you will need to add a little more to compesate for the tank toward the end of the dive.  If you are diving with a steel tank the same holds true except you will need less weight.  That is why it is so important to perform a neutral buoyancy check before beginning your dive.   

What You Should Never Do on a Dive

  
  
  
  
  

What You Should Never Do on a Dive


The golden rules of what NOT to do while scuba diving. Use common sense & scuba training to have fun and stay safe.

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Never Not Have A Plan Do your research. Plan your dive & dive your plan. Agree with your buddy on depth, time, safety stops & minimum air before you head to the exit point. Check your equipment!

Don't Be Sick Including hangovers. You'll want as much energy as possible to dive & you'll want to stay hydrated. Eat at least 2 hours before hand & drink plenty of water. Take sea sickness pills to build immunity.

Do Not Go Outside Your Comfort Level This isn't some reverse psychology ploy. If you feel uncomfortable diving that deep, DON'T DO IT. Stay within your comfort level, skill & training. Otherwise, you could panic and get hurt.

Never Hold Your Breath When you descend the pressure on your lungs increases & your lung volume decreases, it's the opposite for ascending. A diver who holds his breath underwater seals off his lungs, severely hurting them.

Never Go Alone Use the buddy system; one person below, one above and yourself. It can be incredibly dangerous (and difficult) to dive by yourself. If you are certified, bring another certified friend.

Don't Buddy Breath Unless you and a buddy have practiced breathing from a single regulator, do not do it. Typically, one of you will forget to control your buoyancy.

Proceed with Bad Weather Ask around about weather & conditions the morning of. Err on the side of caution: if it's too rough and it could lead to a dangerous situation, don't go.

Top 5 Reasons to Try A Scuba Group Trip

  
  
  
  
  

Top 5 Reasons to Try A Scuba Group Trip

Posted By Megan via PADI

http://www.scuba-do.net/images/group%20dive.jpg

If you’ve never enjoyed the experience of a group scuba diving trip, now’s the time to sign up for one. Group trips offer many advantages and opportunities that you miss out on when traveling alone. Here are five reasons why you might want to sign up for a group trip:

1. Enjoy activities and locations chosen by experienced travelers

When planning a scuba trip in unfamiliar territory, it’s difficult to know where the best dive spots and operators are located. If you go on a group trip, all of the locations, dive operators and activities are chosen by experienced, knowledgeable travelers so you can enjoy the best experience possible.

2. Save money

Traveling can be expensive, especially when you travel alone. Going on a group trip is cheaper than booking an individual flight, which means you can spend less money on the travel fees and more money on fun souvenirs and experiences.

3. Great photos and videos of the experience

If you go on a scuba trip with a group, there will be other travelers who will shoot photos and videos, which will make it easier to show others some of your memories from the trip.

4. Create long-lasting friendships

Just like the summer camp you went to as a kid, group trips allow you to meet new people and create long-lasting friendships. A group trip is one of the best ways to meet new people and find new dive buddies. We often hear about folks who live in different parts of the world and meet up once or twice a year just to go diving.

5. Network with other guests

You never know how the connections you make can affect your future. Networking with the right people can open up opportunities for you down the road, whether it’s in your personal or work life. By signing up for a group trip, you are not only making new friends, but you are also making new connections.

9 Pieces of Gear Every Diver Should Know

  
  
  
  
  

9 Pieces of Gear Every Diver Should Know

By Thomas Gronfeldt

Properly using these 10 items will make your dives safer and more enjoyable


1. DSMBScreen shot 2011-08-20 at 6.06.32 PM A delayed surface marker buoy (DSMB), or safety sausage, is a long, tube-shaped balloon, usually orange, that you inflate underwater with your regulator or octopus, sending it to the surface to signal the dive boat or someone on shore of your presence. It is often used in situations of moderate to high current to let the Zodiac know where you are after a dive ends. But simple as it sounds, it can be tricky to use these properly, and divers tend to get tangled up in the line or to ascend uncontrolled along with the DSMB, so practice is important.

 

2. Jonlineclimbing equipment
A jonline is a simple hook or carabiner attached to about 6 feet of webbing. If you’re stuck on a shot line during a safety stop with lots of other divers, it can be difficult for everyone to stay within the safety-stop zone. By attaching the jonline to the shot line, you can move away from the shot line without being carried off by a current, leaving more room for everyone else.

 

3. SnorkeliStock_000013905694Small
I’m not the world’s biggest fan of snorkels, but if you do bring one, make sure you know how to use it. Take the time to learn how to breathe effectively in it, how to clear it, and how to place it properly so it doesn’t get in your way. I’ve seen a number of people nearly drown from inefficient snorkel clearing.

 

4. Trauma shearsiStock_000016106766Small
Knives are popular, but often trauma shears can be even more effective. They can be operated with one hand, even while cutting a line; there’s less risk of inflicting damage on yourself or others; and there is less potential for legal issues when traveling.

 

5. Line reellinereel
Line reels are one of the multi-tools of scuba diving. Often used for an easy return to a specific point, such as an ascent point or an exit point in a wreck or cave, or to tether onto a surface buoy, they are inexpensive and reliable. They do tend to get into a tangled mess if you’re not vigilant, so learning proper line-handling skills is important.

6. Signaling mirrorsignalmirror
A diver on the surface doesn’t have a very large profile, making him hard to spot even for people who are actively looking. And the ambient sounds at sea make it nearly impossible to shout loud enough to get someone’s attention. So if you need to communicate with someone, either on land or on a boat, a simple signaling mirror can do the trick, even over fairly long distances. At night, a powerful dive torch can do the same.

 

7. Dive computerdivecomputer
Most people have computers, but few take the time to get to know their functions. Nothing is more disconcerting than seeing a warning go off during a dive and having no idea what it means. Read the instruction manual thoroughly and get to know your new dive computer’s functions.

 

8. Reef hookScuba diver using a reef hook at the Blue Corner dive site in Palau.
A controversial piece of equipment, the reef hook is used to hold on to a reef if you need to come to a stop in a strong current, either to wait for a potential marine life sighting, to prevent yourself from being swept away, or as part of a safety stop. If used incorrectly, they can damage sensitive coral reefs, but when used correctly they can be a lot less damaging than holding on to the reef with your hand. Place them only on the rocky part of a reef, and check for plant or animal life first.

 

9. Common sensecommonsense

While not, strictly speaking, a piece of gear, common sense is still the single most important thing to use before, during and after a dive. Remember your training, respect your limitations and don’t do anything stupid. This, more than anything, will keep you safe.

 

Get ready for the 2014 dive season

  
  
  
  
  

Get ready for the 2014 dive season

Posted by Natacha Gajdoczki

new-season

The 2014 dive season is underway and if you aren’t ready to grab your dive bag and head off for your next exotic location, what are you waiting for? Before you strap on your gear, be sure that you are completely prepared for another season of underwater adventures. It takes more than the right gear to get you ready for everything the water will throw in your direction. Your body must be prepared for rough conditions as well as the physical and lung strength it takes to successfully complete a dive.

 

Don’t get out of shape during your off-season. Before you plan a dive, get a quick health and fitness assessment to ensure that you are safely taking the plunge. You may not have to be in Iron Man shape, but it is important to not have any injuries or health issues that may affect your ability to dive. Consult a medical professional to give you the green light if you have recently had any changes in health. Diving will give you a good workout, so be sure that your legs, glutes and core are ready for the journey.

 

Another item you will want to check off your list is your equipment. Be sure that it is in peak condition and ready for use. You may want to have your equipment professionally serviced to ensure its safety. An equipment failure is not something to take lightly and can be prevented with regular service and care. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations to ensure that your gear will continue working like new with every dive. Finally, if your body and equipment are ready to go, make sure that the skills required are fresh in your mind. Brush up on important information, or even take some courses to learn new skills.  

Should I Get A Dive Computer

  
  
  
  
  

Should I Get A Dive Computer

By: Charles Davis

 

Dive Computers are a Sign of Dedication

Each diver will have to decide for themselves if a dive computer is a must have, nice to have or a waste of money. Most serious divers swear by their computers but in reality they were most likely diving for  quite a while before purchasing their computer. Dive computers are relatively new in the overall scope of scuba diving and will most likely be your most expense purchase, even more than the training and basic equipment. The variety and capabilities of the different computers on the market are staggering. However, before you even start sorting through the different manufacturers and models, you really need to determine do you need one and how great is the need. You learned the dive charts in your training and they have served you well. When you plan your dive, you look up your limits and adjust your plan to ensure that you stay within the safe limits. Before your second dive, it is back to the charts to look at your residual times. When you start doing dives that are a little more difficult to plan such as a multiple level dive, then you can start using the dive wheel. However both require you to stay within the plan. Also they assume that you are at the same depth for the same amount of time that you calculated.

What is a Dive Computer

Before getting to involved with the topic, I think a brief definition should be included. While there are numerous features on different models we will stick to the basics. Technically it a very difficult process. The computer is able to take its own pressure reading and can accurately keep time. Inside the dive computer are what are referred to as compartments. The number varies by model, but they are calculations designed to mimic the effects of nitrogen on different type of tissue within your body: such as fat, muscle, tendons and so forth. Tissue types absorb and release nitrogen at different rates. Every two seconds or so the computer take a pressure reading, calculates  the lapse time and updates the compartments. Using a logarithm based on dive tables it calculated and displays your NDL and other information. The computer is calculating on the performed dived not on how it was planned. Computers are not perfect, there are items that affect the absorption rate that the computers can not measure, such as your activity level, the presence of drugs or alcohol in your blood or your level of hydration. The use of a dive computer allows you to maximize your time underwater using real time data while keeping you within a safe profile.

Dive Computer 

What is Your Normal Dive

The types of dive you do will be a factor whether it is a must have, nice to have or a waste of money to get a dive computer. If you only dive infrequently and at shallow depths then a dive computer may not be necessary for you. A dive at 30 or 40 feet can easily be managed using the dive tables. If you are doing dives around 60 feet but at a single depth then there may be some use for a computer but it is still limited. If the 60 foot dive is also able to be done as a multilevel then you will see some benefits of a computer allowing a little extra dive time.  It is not unusual to an additional 15 or 20 minutes to a dive that goes to 60 feet but returns to 30 feet during the dive. Once you start diving beyond 60 feet then a computer becomes a very useful tool.

If you have not used a dive computer yet, I would suggest you rent one for a few dives. Many dive centers have computers for rent. Some center are even making a computer a requirement for deep dives. Deep being defined at below 60 feet. Plan the dive as you normally would but, use the readings from the computer during the dive. Afterward compare what you were able to safely dive with the times listed in the dive plan. This should help illustrate the value of the computer for your diving style.

If you are thinking of getting a computer, project how many dives will you do in a year, also how many of those are deep dives. Also take the cost of the dive computer you are interested in and divided it by the cost to rent the computer. This will tell you how many dives it would take to pay for the computer based on the rental cost. These three number should show you the economic benefits of buying instead of renting.

Dive More Safely

Dive computers have helped many divers maximize bottom times while still staying in a safe range of risk. They are also able to warn a diver that has exceeded his NDL and to provide guidance to reduce the risk with decompression stops. Given the serious injuries that can result from DCS, a dive computer should be considered for anyone who dives near the edge of the dive tables maximum time.

 

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