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Featured Author // August 3, 2019

5 Reasons Your Family Should Get Scuba Certified

We all know how incredible the ocean can be to explore underwater, but wouldn’t it be even more amazing to share these moments with your family? Children as young as 8 years old can be introduced to scuba diving through the PADI Bubblemaker program. While those aged 10 years or older can embark on their PADI Junior Open Water Diver course. It’s never too late to get scuba certified and start living the dream as a scuba family. Not convinced? Check out these 5 reasons why you should get your family certified.

 

Group Dive - Scuba Divers - PADI

 

1. Shared Interest for Exploration

If you’re a parent you would know the struggle of trying to find a weekend family activity that everyone enjoys and agrees on. However, if your family becomes scuba certified you will always have a new dive site to explore, new skills to learn and new marine animals to spot underwater – no two dives are ever the same. Scuba diving is the perfect activity to show your family the beauty of the underwater world, inspire ocean conservation and create memories that will last a lifetime.

2. More Outdoor Family Time

In this day and age, technology has become an integral part of our daily regime (whether we like it or not). From answering emails to playing games, watching YouTube or going on social media, technology is everywhere. Scuba diving allows your family to be immersed in nature and the outdoors, while also eliminating the possibility of anyone being able to check their phones. Who else knows a family member that could do with a scuba diving technology detox?

3. No One Misses Out

If you’re a diver you would already know how hard it is to scuba on a family holiday. From finding spare time outside of activities to organising babysitters or even destination choices – fitting in just one dive can be hard, let alone a few! Instead of watching your family snorkel above you or leaving them on the dive boat, why not show them the oceans beauty from another view? Not only will you be able to experience incredible adventures underwater, but your family will also be bursting with conversation topics for years to come – who doesn’t love a good diving story!

 

Scuba Divers - Underwater - Friends - Pair of Divers

 

4. Easier Holiday Planning

Deciding on what destination you should choose for your next holiday should be exciting not challenging. For some families this decision can erupt in chaos with disagreements over what destination to choose – hot or cold, history or scenery, ocean or no ocean. However, when you share a common interest these discussions become easier and arguments begin to dissipate among family members. With a scuba family your holiday planning becomes simplified to ‘what diving destination do you want to cross off your bucket list? Thailand, Mexico, Indonesia or maybe Egypt?’ Once you have chosen your holiday destination you can then start planning some diving activities that the whole family can enjoy together.

5. Cherished Memories (and Photos) Forever

Are you someone who loves sharing photos on social media or maybe you love putting together a photo album after your holiday? Imagine the phenomenal photos and videos you will be able to capture while diving on a family holiday – we bet none of your friends will have family photos quite like yours! Not only will you have beautiful photos and videos to share from your trip, but you will have many diving stories to share. Diving with your family is an incredible experience that will leave you with many treasured memories (and photos) for years to come.

Want to start living the dream as a scuba family? Learn more about the PADI Open Water Diver course, PADI Bubblemaker Program and the PADI Junior Open Water Diver course today!

 

Source: https://blog.padi.com/2019/06/20/5-reasons-your-family-should-get-scuba-certified/

Author:

Featured Author // June 6, 2019

How to Face your Fears in Scuba Diving

 

underwater

 

The sea holds many new experiences; these can be both wonderful and terrifying. Even more daunting can be the fears we face within ourselves in learning to dive: failure and rejection are always close when we challenge ourselves. 

But we know a lot about fear and how to face it!

“Feeling the fear and doing it anyway” 

Fear is powerful, but it is transient. It appears from nowhere and disappears when exposed. Fear feeds on doubt and uncertainty. It creates an illusion that it is bigger than it really is. For these reasons, the core principle in overcoming any fear is to face it. But be aware, sometimes fear is a justified warning bell that needs to be heeded. It may be advising you of a real threat. Or perhaps reminding you that you are not prepared, or fit, for the dive. 

Change what you do

Psychological research shows that overcoming fear is not simply about exposing yourself to the source. Getting close to fear is important. Putting yourself in the situation is essential if you want to break the grip of fear. However, to truly go beyond fear, you must change what you do when it shows up.  Instead of avoiding the fear through distraction, numbing or worry, your effort can be used to take actions that make a difference.

Build scuba skills to remove fear

Remove your fears by building scuba skills

If fear thrives on uncertainty, it withers in competence.  Competence comes from learning and practicing skills. If you know you are capable of responding the potential challenges of diving, then there is less reason to fear.  If you fear a leaking mask, the answer is not to dive deeper, blindly fighting fear. Instead the solution would be to seek professional support and work on your mask clearing skills. 

So, be brave, but don’t tough it out when learning 

Draw on your courage in facing fears and you will see the benefits.  But remember, the thinking parts of our brain go offline when we are excessively stressed. To learn skills effectively, we need to stay connected.

If you find yourself overly stressed in training, take a break, ask for more support and additional time. Skills can be broken down into smaller steps.  You can always go back to the swimming pool for practice, to develop confidence and competence. The PADI system of education is built to aid you in this development. 

Feel the fear.  Change what you do. But most of all, learn the skills you need to rise to challenges in your diving and face your fears with confidence. Again, and again, and again.

 

Source: https://www2.padi.com/blog/2019/02/06/how-to-face-your-fears-in-scuba-diving/

AUTHOR BIO:

Dr Laura Walton is a Clinical Psychologist and PADI IDC Staff Instructor with a fascination for the psychology of diving. Visit scubapsyche to learn more about our behaviour as divers.

Chris White // May 2, 2019

The Most Rewarding Training Experience

 


Diver rescue

 

Divers often describe PADI’s Rescue Diver course as the most rewarding of all their training experiences. Becoming a Rescue Diver not only teaches you how to prevent dive accidents and emergencies — and how to manage them should they arise — but it also consolidates your skills and experience from earlier courses, making you a more confident and accomplished diver. More than any other course, Rescue Diver training increases awareness of the dive environment and the factors that affect diver safety. Learning how to interpret and react to those factors makes the course both fulfilling and fun. It is designed for anyone interested in expanding on the basic rescue skills that they learned in their entry-level courses, with the goal of becoming equipped to help themselves and others in an emergency situation. It is also a mandatory step in becoming a PADI professional. There are a few prerequisites to enrolling in the course: potential Rescue Divers must be at least 12 years old, and have completed their PADI Adventure Diver certification with Underwater Navigation as a mandatory specialty. In addition, candidates must have undergone EFR Primary and Secondary training within the last 24 months, although this can be done in conjunction with the Rescue course. The Rescue course will teach you how to adapt the skills learned during EFR training to situations pertinent to diving.

 

Diver rescue

 

Unlike previous courses, the Rescue Diver course involves relatively little time spent underwater. Instead, there are two main components, the first of which is a theory section comprised of five knowledge reviews and a final exam. Divers will explore a range of topics including the psychology of rescue, recognizing diver stress, and preparing an emergency assistance plan for a specific dive site. The second component of the course is devoted to skill mastery. While that may not sound particularly interesting, this section involves a lot of teamwork and role-play, which demands constant awareness and quick thinking. The skill sequences are challenging, adrenalin-inducing and above all, fun. The practical section of the course is divided into three sections: self-rescue skills, ten rescue exercises and two rescue scenarios. The self-rescue skills are basic and should be familiar from earlier courses; they include cramp release, establishing positive buoyancy at the surface and using an alternative air source. As simplistic as these skills may seem, they are effective ways of alleviating problems that without proper attention could become far more severe. Much of the Rescue Diver course is dedicated to preventing accidents from happening in the first place or to mitigating them in their early stages. It is always preferable to avert an emergency rather than to face one.

 

Diver rescue

 

The ten rescue exercises are the backbone of the course, and teach individuals how to react to a variety of potential accidents or scenarios. They include learning how to appropriately assist tired and panicked divers, how to respond to distressed divers from shore and underwater, the most efficient ways to search for a missing diver, proper exiting techniques, and how to administer oxygen and in-water rescue breaths. Mastery of these skills could one day mean the difference between tragedy and survival; by knowing how to perform them effectively you become equipped to save lives. Your instructor will have assistants simulate these scenarios at any given time throughout the course, often without warning. You will be expected to react to them quickly and efficiently, as if the accident had occurred in real life. The skills that you learn as a result of this training will be put to the test in the rescue scenario section of the course, when you will be required to react to an unresponsive diver at the surface and an unresponsive diver underwater, performing the necessary steps for a rescue from start to finish.

 

Most divers who complete their Rescue Diver training will never have to provide assistance in the aftermath of a dive accident. Thankfully, serious dive accidents happen with a scarcity that means the most valuable skills divers take away from their training are normally preventative ones, such as recognizing and managing diver stress or eliminating vertigo before it becomes a problem. However, knowing that you are able to cope with an emergency not only makes you a better buddy, but also a generally more confident, capable diver. It is important not to let your newfound skills stagnate; keep them up to date and refreshed with frequent practice. That way, whatever situations arise, you will be sufficiently equipped to deal with them in the safest and most effective way possible.


Diver rescue

Divers often describe PADI’s Rescue Diver course as the most rewarding of all their training experiences. Becoming a Rescue Diver not only teaches you how to prevent dive accidents and emergencies — and how to manage them should they arise — but it also consolidates your skills and experience from earlier courses, making you a more confident and accomplished diver. More than any other course, Rescue Diver training increases awareness of the dive environment and the factors that affect diver safety. Learning how to interpret and react to those factors makes the course both fulfilling and fun. It is designed for anyone interested in expanding on the basic rescue skills that they learned in their entry-level courses, with the goal of becoming equipped to help themselves and others in an emergency situation. It is also a mandatory step in becoming a PADI professional. There are a few prerequisites to enrolling in the course: potential Rescue Divers must be at least 12 years old, and have completed their PADI Adventure Diver certification with Underwater Navigation as a mandatory specialty. In addition, candidates must have undergone EFR Primary and Secondary training within the last 24 months, although this can be done in conjunction with the Rescue course. The Rescue course will teach you how to adapt the skills learned during EFR training to situations pertinent to diving.

Diver rescue

Unlike previous courses, the Rescue Diver course involves relatively little time spent underwater. Instead, there are two main components, the first of which is a theory section comprised of five knowledge reviews and a final exam. Divers will explore a range of topics including the psychology of rescue, recognizing diver stress, and preparing an emergency assistance plan for a specific dive site. The second component of the course is devoted to skill mastery. While that may not sound particularly interesting, this section involves a lot of teamwork and role-play, which demands constant awareness and quick thinking. The skill sequences are challenging, adrenalin-inducing and above all, fun. The practical section of the course is divided into three sections: self-rescue skills, ten rescue exercises and two rescue scenarios. The self-rescue skills are basic and should be familiar from earlier courses; they include cramp release, establishing positive buoyancy at the surface and using an alternative air source. As simplistic as these skills may seem, they are effective ways of alleviating problems that without proper attention could become far more severe. Much of the Rescue Diver course is dedicated to preventing accidents from happening in the first place or to mitigating them in their early stages. It is always preferable to avert an emergency rather than to face one.

Diver rescue

The ten rescue exercises are the backbone of the course, and teach individuals how to react to a variety of potential accidents or scenarios. They include learning how to appropriately assist tired and panicked divers, how to respond to distressed divers from shore and underwater, the most efficient ways to search for a missing diver, proper exiting techniques, and how to administer oxygen and in-water rescue breaths. Mastery of these skills could one day mean the difference between tragedy and survival; by knowing how to perform them effectively you become equipped to save lives. Your instructor will have assistants simulate these scenarios at any given time throughout the course, often without warning. You will be expected to react to them quickly and efficiently, as if the accident had occurred in real life. The skills that you learn as a result of this training will be put to the test in the rescue scenario section of the course, when you will be required to react to an unresponsive diver at the surface and an unresponsive diver underwater, performing the necessary steps for a rescue from start to finish.

Most divers who complete their Rescue Diver training will never have to provide assistance in the aftermath of a dive accident. Thankfully, serious dive accidents happen with a scarcity that means the most valuable skills divers take away from their training are normally preventative ones, such as recognizing and managing diver stress or eliminating vertigo before it becomes a problem. However, knowing that you are able to cope with an emergency not only makes you a better buddy, but also a generally more confident, capable diver. It is important not to let your newfound skills stagnate; keep them up to date and refreshed with frequent practice. That way, whatever situations arise, you will be sufficiently equipped to deal with them in the safest and most effective way possible.

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