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Chris White // January 30, 2018

8 Reasons to Dive The Philippines

Diver and corals by Cool.jpg

 

1. Chosen as one of the Top Three Dive Sites in the World

It has been scientifically proven that we are the epicenter of marine biodiversity in the world.   488 of the 500 known coral species in the world are found here spread in over 13,000 square miles of coral reefs, many of which have been grown since the Ice Age.  Plus there are over a thousand different species of marine life. All of this can be enjoyed with water temperatures averaging 28C. I will post more blogs giving the details about the Coral Triangle.

 2. Delectable foods

Each region has also its own particular cuisine.  Filipino food is a diverse blend of Oriental, European and American culinary tastes.  Fresh seafood is abundant here.

 3. Full of exotic and pristine beaches.

Boracay Island is but one of the countless beaches that you can enjoy here.  With more than 7, 000 islands here, world- class beaches with crystal-blue waters of both the China Sea and the Pacific Ocean are abundant here. Explore the other top beaches here: Alona Beach of Panglao Island in Bohol, Coron and El Nido Islands of Palawan, Dumaguete, Camiguin Island and of course, White Beach and Lambok Beaches at Moalboal and Badian in Cebu

 4. We are a vibrant, fun- loving and eclectic group of people

The Philippines has 16 regions each with their own particular culture, personality and beliefs.  One thing that is similar in each and every Filipino is their hospitality and love of fun which is infectious.

  5. Value spending

Here in the Philippines, your money will go a long, long way.  We manufacture and export world- class products such as furniture, jewelry, accessories, food, guitars (made in Mactan) plus there are branches of globally- renowned brands here.

 6 Relax and rejuvenate

Treat yourself at our spas and health centers at a fraction of the price in your country. Of course, you can enjoy a full-body massage in the newly opened Bay Spa at Turtle Bay Dive Resort.

 7. We are an English- speaking country

Over 90% of the population speaks English in addition to  Filipino and their own local language.

 8. Philippine Fiestas

Filipinos never forget to be thankful for their own patron saints and bountiful harvest by celebrating their town’s festival.  With countless towns and cities, we are a veritable land of fiestas and festivals anytime of the year. The famous Sinulog fiesta in Cebu City culminates on the 3rd Sunday of January each. The Moalboal fiesta is celebrated on May 15 & 16.

 

Photo by Melody Cool

Featured Author // July 27, 2016

Improve Strength and Breathing for Diving

By Gretchen M. Ashton

Performed on an exercise ball, the pike abdominal and push up target the chest and abdominals, and have many benefits for divers.

To improve your strength and breathing for diving, it’s best to target a group of muscles. The pike abdominal and push up is a complex exercise set that targets the chest and abdominals, but has many additional benefits for both the assisting muscles, such as the shoulders, and antagonist muscles such as the triceps, involved in the movements. Performed on an exercise ball, the sequence is broken down into several separate moves to allow easy transitions in strength and confidence.

Some positions help strengthen the shoulders and back while also acting as safe alternatives for divers with shoulder or back injuries, so find the combination that works best for you. One of the biggest advantages of this exercise, when it comes to diving, is that while you’re strengthening your upper body and torso, you’re simultaneously training your body to support deep, relaxed, and controlled breathing for diving. Believe it or not, better breathing when it comes to diving is attainable by strengthening the muscles of the chest and torso.

Better Breathing, Better Diving

It’s important to integrate deep breathing into all exercise programs. Especially for divers, practicing deep breathing during abdominal exercises is an excellent opportunity to focus on recruiting the diaphragm muscle, which is responsible for 75 percent of respiratory air flow, and the intercostal muscles, which move the ribs, resulting in 25 percent of respiratory effort. The most recognized chest muscles, pectoralis major and pectoralis minor, often called simply the “pecs” are located in front of the ribcage. They add another layer of protection to the chest when it comes to diving. Studies indicate that the pectoralis major is active during both inhalation and exhalation. The more stable the chest, acting along with the diaphragm, the greater potential for increased lung capacity and oxygenation of the tissue, making the difference between fatigue and endurance. Conversely, tight chest muscles may inhibit breathing capacity and can limit range of motion in the shoulders. When performed properly, strength exercises actually help to actively stretch and expand the chest.

Walk Out on Exercise Ball

Ball Walk Outs: A great way to develop upper body and torso (abs and low back) strength is to support the body on an exercise ball while walking out with the hands. Set up as shown above with the ball under the hips or thighs. With arms extended under the shoulders, walk forward with the hands, rolling the ball along the body until it reaches your shins. Reverse direction and repeat while maintaining balance and keeping the ball moving along the center line of the body. Focus on balance and breathe rhythmically throughout the exercise. This exercise is an excellent alternative to push-ups for divers with shoulder injuries.

Remember to warm up with 10 minutes of aerobic exercise. Begin with an abdominal contraction when walking out on the ball, and let strength and proper form dictate range of motion.

Push Ups with Feet on Exercise Ball

 

Push-ups on the exercise ball: Push-ups are one of many ways to develop upper-body strength for scuba diving. Divers working to master push-ups may find the exercise ball makes the movement easier. Ideal range of motion at the bottom is when the elbows are at just less than a right angle. Remember to fully extend the arms at the top, but do not lock out the elbows. A good beginning goal is to complete five to 15 push-ups. With practice, sets of 25 to 100 are possible. If divers feel pain or strain in the shoulders they should stop until shoulders are confirmed as healthy enough to perform push-ups.

Pike Abdominal

Pike crunch on ball: Divers may take the exercise up a notch by flexing the hips while rolling the ball toward the chest with the feet. This pike position requires a good foundation of overall body strength to perform. It’s a great way to increase strength in the upper body, abdominals and low back, and improves balance and coordination. Repeat the pike about 10 times or alternate with a push-up. When combining the pike with the push-up, make sure to return to a straight body position before performing the push-up.

Check Out Our Dive Centre

Source: http://scubadiverlife.com/2016/05/11/improve-strength-and-breathing-for-diving/

Ericka Villa // June 13, 2016

How To Prevent Vertigo While Scuba Diving

BY JAMES L. CARUSO | Source: http://www.scubadiving.com/how-to-prevent-vertigo-while-scuba-diving

Vertigo can strike in the most unexpected of places. Learn what vertigo is and how you can prevent it using these tips.

 

Vertigo while scuba diving
Shutterstock


Vertigo can strike in the most unexpected of places. Learn what vertigo is and how you can prevent it using these tips.


Q: I SOMETIMES GET VERTIGO BELOW 60 FEET. WHAT’S CAUSING IT, AND HOW CAN I PREVENT IT?

A: Vertigo is the feeling that the world around you is moving, spinning or tilting while you are remaining essentially still. Vertigo can be a result of a number of ailments, ranging from an infection in the inner ear to chronic problems such as Meniere’s disease.
Vertigo is not uncommon among divers, and your experience with it occurring when you are at significant depth is fairly typical. Diving physics tells us that the greatest pressure changes occur closer to the surface, but as the diver descends, equalizing the pressure in the middle ear is still very important. Divers generally continue to descend even when having difculty with equalizing. Plus, the middle ears need to equalize during ascent as well.
You are experiencing alternobaric vertigo, which is caused by unequal pressures between your middle-ear compartments. The pressure diference does not have to be very great. The inequality is communicated to the inner ear organs, resulting in vertigo. Divers can also experience nausea and vomiting. Vertigo is usually more common while a diver ascends. Not only are the symptoms uncomfortable, but they also can lead to catastrophic problems for the diver. Vertigo can also occur when diving with a hood if one side of the hood seals over the ear tighter than the other.
Prevention of vertigo during diving requires careful, gradual and continuous equalization of the pressures within the middle ear throughout the dive.

 

Check Out Our Dive Centre

 

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